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National costume dolls

Dolls from around the world

Germany: Prune lady (Zwetschgenweibla)

Front view
Front view

General description A Munich lady made of dried plums, dressed to go a-visiting

Dimensions 21 cm x 9 cm x 9 cm

Date when acquired 1990s

Original Date 1990s

Source An open-air market in the centre of Munich (Viktualienmarkt). Present from Elizabeth H.

 

 

Body

Her body is made of wire and dried plums (prunes), though her head is made of wood and has painted features. A little bit of grey straggly hair pokes out from under her scarf. She is standing on a slice of silver-birch branch.

 

Back view
Back view

Clothing

She is wearing a high-necked sleeveless black bodice with three gold buttons on the front and a gold embroidered flower on the back. The back has also a pattern of flowers pressed into the material. At the back, the bodice forms a point over her derriere. Her black knee-length skirt has a pattern of large red roses with green leaves. Her apron is made of ivory brocade with a pattern of silver and gold flowers and leaves. The bottom is edged with white lace. The ties are pink silk which form a bow at the back.

On her head is a red scarf tied under her chin.

 

Accessories

In her left hand she is carrying a black umbrella made of black silk and wood. In her right hand is a bouquet of dried flowers.

 

Background information

This doll is a typical representative of the German dried fruit people, known as Zwetschgenmaennla, Zwetschgenmännchen (Germany) or Zwetschgenkrampus (Austria) for male dolls or Zwetschgenweibla (Germany) for female ones. They were originally based on child chimney sweeps and called Pflaumentoffel [plum fire devils] and have been around since about 1790. They became first officially known as little men made of prunes (“Männlein aus Backpflaumen”) when they were sold at a Christmas market in Dresden (Striezelmarkt) in 1801. In the 19th century, children (Striezelkinder) sold these self-made dolls at the Christmas markets throughout Saxony and the Erz Mountain region. Originally, only the limbs were made of prunes, the head was made of a walnut and bodies were made from dried figs. This handicraft, however, is found in many fruit-growing regions in Europe with different stories about how they evolved.

Although these dolls are available throughout the year, they are especially sold at the Christmas markets in Bavaria like that in Nuremberg or Munich. They are given as Christmas presents or for New Year’s Eve as a symbol of luck, reflecting their original chimney sweep form although these dolls can be dressed in many different styles nowadays (350 different ones). Indeed, there is a German saying

“”You will never be without gold and happiness, if you have a prune person in your house.

(Hosd an Zwetschga im Haus, gäid dir es Geld und Gligg ned aus.)

Chimney sweeps have been considered lucky for a long time. Legend has it that William the Conqueror (King of England) decreed in ca. 1066 that all chimney sweeps were lucky as his life was saved by a chimney sweep.

Source(s) of information

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art179049.asp

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pflaumentoffel

http://www.ruchalachimney.com/history.html

http://www.christkindlesmarkt.de/die-welt-der-zwetschgenmannle-1.1686043

Germany (?)

Front view
Front view

General description Female doll wearing a black skirt, bodice and cummerbund, with a white shawl and apron. She has a remarkable black hat on but I have not been able to find out where it comes from.

Dimensions 16 cm x 10 cm x 7 cm

Date when acquired 2000s

Original Date Unknown

Source Flea market in Göttingen

 

 

Body

Plastic body with moveable arms and eyes, the legs are rigid. Her brown hair is drawn back from a central parting in two plaits that are rolled up on the sides of her head and crossed at the back.

 

Back view
Back view

Clothing

She is wearing a long silky black skirt with yellow and gold zig-zag braid around the top of the hem. On top is a black round-necked bodice/jacket with long sleeves made of felt with white lace around the cuffs. She has a white silky apron on over the skirt with white lace around the bottom edge. She is wearing a shawl of the same material though it is edged in black lace. The shawl is tucked into a black felt cummerbund around her waist. Underneath her skirt, she is wearing a white stiffened cotton petticoat and short bloomers made of white ribbed material. Her white knees socks and black shoes are painted on.

Her large black hat is made of felt and has the shape of an up-side-down ship’s keel, being narrow from front to back and extending over each of her shoulders. On the right and left edges are a row of silky tassels. Over the front of the hat is a narrow piece of gold braid.

 

View from the top showing the long thin form of the hat
View from the top showing the long thin form of the hat

Accessories

None

 

Background information

Looked at all the European countries in the internet, but as yet I have found nothing like this costume. It is time to go to the library!

 

Source(s) of information

None

The Czech Republic and Germany: Vogtland

Front view
Front view

General description Married woman wearing a traditional Vogtland costume

Dimensions 15.5 cm x 9.5 cm x 7 cm

Date when acquired 2000s

Original Date Unknown

Source Flea market in Bochum area. Present from Fritz.

 

 

 

Body

Plastic body with movable eyes, arms and legs. Her dark brown hair is drawn back from a central parting into two long plaits tied with red wool.

 

Back view
Back view

Clothing

She is wearing a wide black cotton skirt with a low-cut black cotton bodice. White lace can be seen above the bodice belonging to the white short-sleeved cotton blouse. She is wearing a fringed shawl over her shoulders which is tucked into the front of her apron. Both the shawl and apron are made of a satiny material of red and blue thread woven in stripes or diamond patterns. The apron is tied with black ribbons in the front. Her underclothes consist of white panties made of a stretchy material. Her white stockings are painted on, while her black shoes are made of plastic.

The most remarkable part of her costume is her bonnet (Buckelhaube) made of upright-standing black lace attached to stiffened cotton. Covering the open crown is a stripe of material (braid) embroidered with roses in yellow, pink, red, blue and green. Two long silky ribbons from the back of the hat hang down her back to below her derriere.

 

Top view of the bonnet showing pleated black lace and embroidered material at the back
Top view of the bonnet showing pleated black lace and embroidered material at the back

Accessories

None

 

Background information

This doll is wearing the bonnet and clothing of a typical married woman from the northern Vogtland region. However, she does not have a pin to hold her shawl at the front and her shoes do not have the typical buckle.

See Vogtland information

 

Source(s) of information

See Vogtland information

The Czech Republic and Germany: Vogtland

celtic b-black white-01The term “Vogtland” refers to a region stretching across the German states of Bavaria, Saxony and Thuringia into the Czech Republic (north-western Bohemia and called Fojtsko in Czech).

The traditional costume of this region seems to have been influenced greatly by those found in the neighbouring regions of Upper Franconia and southern Thuringia. The heyday of such traditional costumes was until 1850, though there was no uniform style in Vogtland. This is most probably due to the individual taste of the seamstresses and tailors as well as the little choice in the materials available and the utility of these clothes. The colours of the old Vogtland costumes are mainly dark (brown, dark red, dark green and violet) and its style is not particularly flamboyant in comparison to other forms of traditional costume.

Women’s costume

Fringed shawl tucked into the apron
Fringed shawl tucked into the apron

The skirt is made of a silky patterned material. Underneath are 4—5 short petticoats (Reichnbächer) with many gathers to give a full figure. An apron is worn over the skirt and is also made of silky patterned material. The apron is tied with very long silk ties tied in a bow. Both women and girls wear blue or white stockings with buckled shoes. Young women and girls wear a velvet bodice, with a colourful shawl (Busentuch) closed at the neck with a pin. Older women wear a short bodice made from quilted material (Spenzer). White blouses with short, wide puffed sleeves are worn under the bodice.

Buckelhaube showing the black lace sides and the embroidered Haubenfleck  at the back
Buckelhaube showing the black lace sides and the embroidered Haubenfleck at the back

Young women wear a dark scarf with brightly coloured corners and long fringes tied around their heads. The corners of the scarf are tied in a large bow on top of the head so that the fringes fall over the forehead. Married or older women wear a bonnet, the so-called Buckelhaube, on the back of their heads. The sides of the bonnet are made of broad black lace and a number of dark silk ribbons hang down from the bonnet. The back of the bonnet is formed by a very valuable highly embroidered piece of material, the Haubenfleck or “Die Schau”. It is decorated with glitter and the embroidery is often done with real gold. Long silver or gold ear-rings are often worn.

In southern Vogtland and the area around Asch (Aš) and Hof in the Czech Republic, instead of wearing a Buckelhaube, the women wear a bonnet on their heads around which a black fringed scarf is wound. Girls wear their hair combed back from the forehead and tied in a bun, while older women have a sort of nest at the back of their heads which is held in place by a double-pointed arrow made of horn. Ringlets are curled at each side of the temples (so-called Schneckenhäuseln: little snail shells). Adult women had to wear a bonnet, while girls wore a scarf with a bow over the forehead.

Adult women had long bodice and skirt ensembles, whereby the gathered skirt was very full. They wore a white blouse with half-sleeves. Most important was a shawl with fringes and an apron with long decorative ties. Whoever could afford one wore a short jacket (Spenzer) with a collar and leg-of-mutton sleeves.

Men’s costume

Men wear long or knee-length trousers made of leather or woven cloth. The outer part of the cuff of the knee breeches is open and tied with a strap, which also holds up the white or blue socks. The shoes are made of cow leather and have a large brass buckle or the men wore long boots. The silk or velvet waistcoat is decorated with either colourful stripes, flowers or check patterns and has many buttons. The shirt is made of coarse handmade linen (Leimet) and has a broad unstarched collar which lies over the waistcoat. A colourful silk or cotton scarf is worn around the neck. A coat or very long jacket (worn only on Sundays or official holidays) is used made of black or blue material and has large buttons. A cloth cap with a large peak (De Dachmitz) is worn on the head.

Source(s) of information

http://www.echt-vogtland.de/schweiz/schweiztracht.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vogtland

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vogtland

http://www.alte-kiehvotz.de/berichte/vogtlaendische-trachten/

Germany: Föhr, Schleswig-Holstein

Front view
Front view

General description Female doll in the Friesian costume typical for the island of Föhr

Dimensions 18 cm x 10 cm x 7cm

Date when acquired 2011

Original Date Unknown

Source Produced by Sweetheart in West Germany.

Flea market in Bochum region: present from Fritz.

 

 

Body

Plastic body with movable arms, legs and eyes. Her blonde hair is drawn back from a central parting to two plaits down each side of her face. The plaits are tied with red wool.

 

Back view
Back view

Clothing

She is wearing a black Dirndl-style black dress with white lace around the cuffs, neck and hem. There is a blue braid embroidered with a gold, white and red stylised pattern of flowers running around the hem. The lower part of the dress’s skirt is stiffened with white cotton. She is wearing a black felt bodice decorated with three sea snail shells with a silver chain hanging between the two outer shells. Around her neck and tucked into the front of the bodice is a red silk shawl. Her apron is made of white lace. It is tied at the back with a white ribbon. She is wearing white underpants. Her white stockings are painted on. Her low black shoes are made of plastic.

She is wearing a black felt hat with the same braid at the front as that around the hem of her skirt but with a black background instead of blue. Two long black lace ribbons hang down from the sides of the braid to her wrists.

 

Close up of the top of the headdress showing embroidery
Close up of the top of the headdress showing embroidery

Accessories

No accessories

 

Close-up of the bodice jewellery
Close-up of the bodice jewellery

Background information

The doll does not have the extensive jewellery described for the Föhr costume but she does have chains and sea shells on her bodice which are to be seen in modern pictures of Föhr costumes. Instead of a complexly pinned head scarf and embroidered band, she has a simpler felt bonnet in the shape of the head scarf once it is pinned. Otherwise, the costume is very close to the original

See Föhr information

 

Source(s) of information

See Föhr information

Germany: Föhr

celtic b-black white-01Föhr (North Frisian Fering: Feer; Danish: Før) is one of the North Frisian Islands off the North Sea coast of Germany. It is part of the German state of Schleswig-Holstein. Apart from German, a dialect of the North Frisian language, Fering, is frequently spoken on Föhr. The traditional Föhr women’s costume is still part of every-day life, especially on the western side of the island, as it is worn on special occasions, such as for confirmation or weddings. The costumes are inherited from generation to generation and are remarkably expensive (~€ 5,000). The Föhr costume was voted traditional costume of the year (Trachten des Jahres) in 2012 by the German traditional costume society (Deutscher Trachtenverband). There is no traditional costume for men.

 

The Föhr costume in its present form has been in existence since about 1890. The richness of the materials and the ornate jewellery (necklace, bodice ornaments, bracelets, filigree pins to hold the headdress) reflect the times when the islanders were rich due to their whale hunting activities. The silver jewellery also has an amulet function: cross = belief, heart = love and anchor = hope. Looking at the pictures in the internet, sea shells are also part of the decoration, which is not surprising considering the island has a 15-km long beach running along its southern shore and half-way up its western shoreline.

The Föhr costume consists of an apron, skirt, bodice with sleeves, shawl and headscarf. The apron is made of fine white lace made of cambric decorated with eyelet embroidery (Lochstickerei). The ankle-length skirt is made of so-called cloth made of English weave (englisches Tuch) and is sewn onto the bodice. The skirt is 3.5—4 m wide and has 60 folds on the back part. The shawl is triangular and has a black fringe. On the headdress, above the forehead, a broad band embroidered with flowers is sewn onto the head scarf. There are long ribbons hanging down from the sides of this band. Married women wear a red bonnet embroidered with black beads over the elaborately embroidered scarf. They wear their hair in a bun, while girls put their hair in plaits.

The head scarf and shawl are fixed using more than 100 pins, so that putting on the costume can take more than 2 hours and the wearer needs someone to help them get dressed.
Source(s) of information

http://www.foehr.de/unsere-insel/filme/die-foehrer-tracht/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Föhr

http://www.foehr.de/urlaubswelten/kultur/friesische-traditionen/foehrer-tracht/

Germany: Munich, Bavaria

Front view
Front view

General description Doll in Dirndl costume but without a bodice.

Dimensions 15 cm x 10 cm x 8 cm

Date when acquired 1980s

Original Date 1980s

Source Bought by my parents in Munich, Germany

 

 

 

 

Body

Hard plastic with movable arms, legs and eyes. Her light brown hair is drawn back from a central parting to a bun at the back of her head.

 

Back view
Back view

Clothing

She is wearing a white cotton, high-necked blouse with puffed sleeves. There is white lace edging the sleeve cuffs. This is covered by a yellow brocade shawl with a fringe made of threads pulled from the brocade. The shawl is tucked in her blue silk apron. The apron is edged with white lace. The same white lace is used to hem the long black brocade skirt. A deep border of black braid embroidered with alpine flowers (edelweiss, gentians, etc.) in red, white, blue and green runs around the hem. She has a stiff white cotton petticoat on under her skirt. Her stockings are painted on. Her low black shoes are made of plastic. One has gone missing through the many moves I have made.

 

She has a black wide-brimmed hat on with a down feather on the left brim. This is typical of married women in the Berchtesgaden style, though without the gold cord or tassels.

 

Top view of hat showing crown and down feather
Top view of hat showing crown and down feather

Accessories

No accessories

 

Background information

See general information about Bavaria.

 

Source(s) of information

See background information.

Germany: Upper Swabia (?)

Front view
Front view

General description Female doll in a Dirndl with a golden halo hat (Radhaube)

Dimensions 16 cm x 8 cm x 7 cm

Date when acquired 2013

Original Date Early 1960s

Source Present from Anne-Marie. Was given to her by her parents when she was a child.

 

 

Body

Hard plastic with movable arms and legs. The features are painted on. Her blonde hair is drawn back from a central parting into a single plait that is wrapped around her head from left to right.

 

Back view
Back view

Clothing

She is wearing a short white puffed-sleeved blouse with white lace around the cuffs and white lace at the yoke which peaks out above the front of the low-cut red felt bodice. The long black cotton skirt has a red silk hem. She has a lilac-pink brocade apron embroidered with a pattern in red and pink flowers and dots. The apron is tied at the front with a black ribbon. It also has a band of black lace along the lower third. She has a white cotton petticoat and underpants under the skirt. Her short white socks and black low shoes are painted on.

Her gold-mesh halo is attached to a gold crown. Between the halo and the crown is a thin black ribbon tied into a bow with two long ribbons falling almost to the hem of her skirt.

 

Bird's eye view of the halo
Bird’s eye view of the halo

Accessories

She is wearing a black velvet choker with a single white pearl in the middle.

 

Background information

The choker or Kropfband around the doll’s throat is typical of Bavarian jewellery and was used to hide the almost ubiquitous goitre that affected the people of this mountainous region lacking in iodine before iodinated salt was used. Her halo hat (Radhaube) appears to be that of Upper Swabia (Oberschwaben), a region in southern Germany extending between the states of Bavaria (Lake Constance) and Baden-Würtemberg (Danube river).

See Bavaria information

See: Germany and Austria: hats (3) Halo hats

 

Source(s) of information

http://www.museum-der-alltagskultur.de/ausstellungen/zeitspruenge/?mobile=1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Swabia

http://www.suedkurier.de/skplus/skthemen/blickpunkt-seeost/Die-Pracht-der-Tracht;art1188140,7661921

See Bavaria information

See: Germany and Austria: hats (3) Halo hats

Germany: East Friesland, Lower Saxony

Front view
Front view

General description Female doll dressed in East Friesian costume according to her box

Dimensions 14 cm x 9 cm x 8 cm

Date when acquired 2013

Original Date Early 1960s

Source Present from Anne-Marie. Was given to her by her parents when she was a child.

 

 

Body

Plastic with sleeping eyes (now stuck) and painted features. Her arms are movable but her legs are rigid. Her reddish hair is drawn back from a central parting into two plaits tied at the back with red ribbon.

 

Back view
Back view

Clothing

She is wearing a moss green silk dress with a black band around the cuffs of her long sleeves and the hem of her long skirt. The neck is straight and high. Around her neck she is wearing a shawl tucked into the belt of her apron. The shawl is crotched with green cotton and has a long fluffy pink fringe. Her apron is a lilac-pink silk and has two black braids with green zig-zags along the bottom. There is a long “ribbon” in red with a white, stylised leaf design weaved into it. She is wearing a stiff white cotton petticoat and knee-length woollen drawers. Her long white socks and low black shoes are painted on.

She is wearing a white lace Doucette cap with a piece of black ribbon behind the front frill and a black ribbon tied in a bow at the back.

 

Top view of the dousette cap
Top view of the dousette cap

Accessories

No accessories

 

Background information

Nothing on this doll fits the description for the East Friesian costume, despite the fact her box said she comes from there.

See East Friesland information.

 

Source(s) of information

See East Friesland information.

Germany: East Friesland

celtic b-black white-01East Frisia or Eastern Friesland (German: Ostfriesland; East Frisian Low Saxon: Oostfreesland) is a coastal region in the northwest of the Germany. It belongs to the State of Lower Saxony. The East Frisians are the eastern branch of the Frisians, a Germanic people and are a recognised minority in Germany.

In the Middle Ages, Friesland (including Eastern Friesland) was one of the richest regions in Europe due to animal farming, shipping and overseas trading. These riches were seen not only in the churches of this region but also in the rich gold and silver jewellery of the farming population. Charlemagne [742(?)—814] gave the normal Friesian the right to wear gold from their heads to their feet as long as they could afford it (“Gold an ihren Fläuptern und bis zu ihren Füßen herab zu tragen, so viel ein jeder bezahlen könn). Over the following centuries, the Friesians suffered from gold fever and the women of this region wore gold brooches, chains, ear-rings and bracelets even on normal days.

Women’s costumes

From the middle of the 16th century, a series of Frisian Trachten were pictured in a publication called the Manninga-Flausbuch – though these costumes were already beginning to disappear. The richer women’s costumes were covered with round or rectangular gold platelets (Schersson) making them look like armour and the dresses could stand up on their own. The women also wore a gold breastplate. A tiara-like brow band (Pael) made of gold and precious stones completed the outfit. Heavy gold chains were worn over the shoulders. Their shoes and socks were decorated with silver, pearls and precious stones. The women thereby wore their (or their husband’s) wealth on their bodies. This type of Trachten is no longer worn, though since the 1980s a couple of folklore groups (Krummhorn and Aurich) have used the Manninga-Flausbuch as the basis for their Trachten although the gold platelets have been replaced by braid embroidered with gold thread.

Another form of Eastern Friesian costume comes from Sandhorst. This consists of a hat (Käppgen), skirt (Rock), petticoat (Unterrock), shawl (Timptuch), jacket (Bostrock), bodice (Unnerpand), blouse (Hemd), apron (Schuud), wristers (Armhanschen) and cloak (Umslager).

The hat is made of two pieces of velvet (Hülle) joined in the middle and fitted to the back of the head by two darts sewn into the hat and by making three folds that are laced together using gold-coloured bands. The bands then hang down the back. The velvet is in dark green, dark red, dark blue or black.

The skirt and jacket are nowadays made of woollen material as the original material (Fiefschaftenstoff) is no longer produced. The skirt is made of 2—4 m of red flannel. The folds at the waist (Kellerfalten) are less deep at the front than at the back to prevent excessive baulk, which would be exacerbated by the apron. The skirt’s hem is finished off with a strip of velvet of variable width. The skirt reaches down to the ankles. The jacket is no longer closed at the front by hooks, buttons are used instead. The sleeves have a leg-of-mutton shape and they are narrow to the elbows, afterwards they open out in a cone shape. The button border and the cuffs of the sleeves are decorated with velvet.

The white shawl is large enough to go from the neck down to the waist and is hemmed using a traditional two-coloured cross-stitch pattern.

The apron is so wide that it covers 2/3 of the waist. It reaches down to about 3 cm above the hem of the skirt. The waist of the apron also has deep folds. The strings of the apron are held by hooks. A ca. 20-cm wide band of white linen or firm cotton with a width according to the size of the apron is attached to the apron like a bib: the Stückje. It is fixed in fine fold to the apron strings (Schürzenbänder) made of twill (Köperstoff) in the same colour as the apron. These bands are so long that they can be tied at the back in a bow with long ribbons hanging down the back. The Stückje is in two colours — red and the colour of the apron — and is embroidered in a fine cross-stitch in a traditional manner using old rural patterns.

The bodice is made of woollen material and is fitted to the form of the body using darts. Its size is adjusted that under the arms about 15 cm of lacing can be seen. The bodice fits to the waist. Its brass rings are sewn onto the cloth so that roughly half of the ring is covered with stitching. The lacing of the rings is done with a ca.1-m-long black cord (Kordeln).
The blouse is buttoned at the front and is made of lawn cotton (Baumwollbatist). The neck is roughly 2 cm larger than that of the jacket. A finely pleated strip of cambric is set in the neck. The sleeves are elbow length and have a strip of finely pleated cambric along the cuffs. The pleats are in a series of figure-of-eights.

The petticoat (Unterrock) is made of cambric and is formed from trapezoid pieces of material, which are separated by cotton lace inserts.
The cloak consists of a large back and two equally sized sides that are cut so they form a tippet. The neck has a small upright collar, on which the hooks to close the cape are sewn. The cape is just long enough to allow the hands to be seen when they hang straight down.
The wrist and the lower arm are enclosed by crocheted wristers made of fine cotton. They end in a point, which extends to the ring finger.

The women wear knee socks made of fine wool or cotton knitted in a fine pattern. Their low-heeled shoes are rounded at the front and do not have any decoration, bands or buckles.

A basket is not referred to in any of the historical descriptions of East Friesian Trachten, but as it is necessary for the members of the Sandhorst folklore group to carry their purses etc., a decision was made to include a basket in their costume. The group decided to use the hat basket shown in a Trachten collection (Ostfriesische Landschaft), which had been formally used to store hats decorated with gold tassels.

 

Men’s costumes

The men wore a hat, neckerchief, waistcoat, shirt, coat, knee breeches (Kniehose), socks and shoes.

The tricorn hat (Dreispitzhut) has an oval shape and a sweat band. The neckerchief is a cotton square folded to form a triangle. The tip of the triangle is rolled up to the long edge and the “roll” is tied as a small scarf around the neck.

The shirt is slightly tailored at the waist. It has a small upright collar. The shirt only has buttons at the top and the end of the button seam is closed with a triangular strap. The sleeves are very wide and set-in at the shoulder. The ends of the sleeves are finely gathered in a narrow cuff. The buttons are covered with fine white threads in the traditional manner.
The waistcoat has a straight cut and two rows of silver buttons. It is made of fine material in either dark blue or grey. The lapels are so made that they can be folded back and button to form revers. However, the waistcoat is usually worn completely buttoned up.

The coat is worn unbuttoned so that the silver buttons of the waistcoat can be seen. As was usual around 1800, a so-called curve (Bogenschnitt) is worked in the back of the coat. The waist is only slightly tailored (straight coat form) and the hem of the coat may not be longer than the top of the kneecap. To fit the wide sleeves of the shirt, the sleeves of the coat are also relatively wide. The buttons are covered with material. There is a narrow upright collar around the neck.

The knee breeches can be black, grey or dark blue. They have two pockets in the front and a small drop-front (Hosenklappe). Each leg of the breeches is closed with a small silver-coloured buckle. The large silver buttons on the drop-front are decorated with traditional rural patterns.

A watch is carried tucked into the waistband at the front, with its chatelaine (Petschaftsanhänger) hanging down so that the various chains, chain lock, signet and key can be seen.

The knitted socks are made of grey wool. They go over the knee and have a small intertwined pattern (Zopf) on the side. The slip-on shoes also have a rounded shape like that of the women’s, however, they have a silver buckle on the front.

 

Sources

http://reisen-ostfriesische-inseln.com/ostfriesische-trachten/

http://vtg-sandhorst.de/html/frauentrachten.html

http://vtg-sandhorst.de/html/mannertracht.html

http://www.marquise.de/de/ethno/trachten/vtracht2.shtml

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Frisia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/East_Frisians

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